Awesome Stuff Women Did

Because women have done more in the past 10,000 years than just pop out babies and make sandwiches.

DISCLAIMER: We make no claim that all women featured here are saints. They did awesome stuff; the women themselves might not have been. Keep that in mind before sending angry notes.

death-by-avengers:

You know the Big Bang Theory episode where Sheldon adopts all those cats

and names them after scientists who were part of the Manhattan Project

WHERE IS THE “HOWARD STARK” CAT SHELDON

WHERE

Serious question, though: where were the Leona Woods and Chien-Shiung Wu cats?  Or the later-Nobel Laureate Maria Goeppert-Mayer?

Loads of women scientists were involved in the Manhattan Project.  Read more about them here!

It is funny, how erasure of women from history can be a double-edged sword.  On the one hand, it would be nice to think that women were not tangled up in such a destructive project.  But they were there, and we owe it to them and future generations to remember them.  

I think we all know who was on Howard Stark’s security detail, though:

blu3rsx:

“16-Year-Old Egyptian Scientist Finds Way to Turn Plastic Waste Into $78 Million of Biofuel!”
What Azza proposes is to break down the plastic polymers found in drinks bottles and general waste and turn them into biofuel feedstock. (This is the bulk raw material that generally used for producing biofuel.) It should be noted that this is not a particularly new idea, but what makes Azza stand out from the crowd is the catalyst that she is proposing. She says that she has found a high-yield catalyst called aluminosilicate, that will break down plastic waste and also produce gaseous products like methane, propane and ethane, which can then be converted into ethanol.

Can I be there when she accepts her Nobel Prize?  This woman has a hand I would very much like to shake.

blu3rsx:

16-Year-Old Egyptian Scientist Finds Way to Turn Plastic Waste Into $78 Million of Biofuel!

What Azza proposes is to break down the plastic polymers found in drinks bottles and general waste and turn them into biofuel feedstock. (This is the bulk raw material that generally used for producing biofuel.) It should be noted that this is not a particularly new idea, but what makes Azza stand out from the crowd is the catalyst that she is proposing. She says that she has found a high-yield catalyst called aluminosilicate, that will break down plastic waste and also produce gaseous products like methane, propane and ethane, which can then be converted into ethanol.

Can I be there when she accepts her Nobel Prize?  This woman has a hand I would very much like to shake.

Pioneered entomology. Documented the life cycles of 186 insect species, including the transformation of caterpillars to butterflies.  Proved definitively that insects do not spontaneous generate from mud, as believed by most contemporaries.  Published her findings (including her detailed paintings) in German instead of Latin, allowing the non-scientists to understand insects.  Went on a self-funded scientific expedition of Surinam, unheard of for women of her time, becoming the first European to observe and record much of the plant and insect life there.  One of the first naturalists to observe insects directly. (Maria Sibylla Merian)

Pioneered entomology. Documented the life cycles of 186 insect species, including the transformation of caterpillars to butterflies.  Proved definitively that insects do not spontaneous generate from mud, as believed by most contemporaries.  Published her findings (including her detailed paintings) in German instead of Latin, allowing the non-scientists to understand insects.  Went on a self-funded scientific expedition of Surinam, unheard of for women of her time, becoming the first European to observe and record much of the plant and insect life there.  One of the first naturalists to observe insects directly. (Maria Sibylla Merian)

invented the 80’s computer the BBC Micro, and designed the instruction set for ARM microprocessors that power most mobile phones, tablets, and embedded computer systems. (Sophie Wilson)

invented the 80’s computer the BBC Micro, and designed the instruction set for ARM microprocessors that power most mobile phones, tablets, and embedded computer systems. (Sophie Wilson)

Graduated from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Astronomy in 1974 and did graduate work in Computer Science at USC. Before receiving her Astronomy degree, she joined Jet Propulsion Laboratory for temporary summer employment, and accepted a position after receiving her degree in the Outer Planet Satellite Ephemeris Development Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a senior engineer (1974–1981). In March 1979, she discovered the anomalous “crescent” off the limb of Jupiter’s moon Io in a picture of Io taken by Voyager 1 for navigation, after the Voyager 1 close encounter with Jupiter. She proposed a series of hypotheses and conducted investigations to prove or disprove them, to identify the “crescent”. She was able to deduce that the observation was a plume erupting from the surface of Io, and volcanic in origin. Her discovery was announced to the world on March 12, 1979.  This was the first non-Earth volcanic eruption ever witnessed and the first proof that other bodies in our solar system are geologically active.  Her discovery of active geology on other worlds is heralded as one of the most important discoveries of the planetary exploration program. (Linda A. Morabito)

Graduated from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Astronomy in 1974 and did graduate work in Computer Science at USC. Before receiving her Astronomy degree, she joined Jet Propulsion Laboratory for temporary summer employment, and accepted a position after receiving her degree in the Outer Planet Satellite Ephemeris Development Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a senior engineer (1974–1981). In March 1979, she discovered the anomalous “crescent” off the limb of Jupiter’s moon Io in a picture of Io taken by Voyager 1 for navigation, after the Voyager 1 close encounter with Jupiter. She proposed a series of hypotheses and conducted investigations to prove or disprove them, to identify the “crescent”. She was able to deduce that the observation was a plume erupting from the surface of Io, and volcanic in origin. Her discovery was announced to the world on March 12, 1979.  This was the first non-Earth volcanic eruption ever witnessed and the first proof that other bodies in our solar system are geologically active.  Her discovery of active geology on other worlds is heralded as one of the most important discoveries of the planetary exploration program. (Linda A. Morabito)

At age fourteen, invented a device to demonstrate when packaged food had gone out of date, which won the 42nd Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition in 2006. The judges said it involved “a highly innovative and creative use of experimental biology” and that it was “very impressive” and “a novel use of technology”. (Aisling Judge)

At age fourteen, invented a device to demonstrate when packaged food had gone out of date, which won the 42nd Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition in 2006. The judges said it involved “a highly innovative and creative use of experimental biology” and that it was “very impressive” and “a novel use of technology”. (Aisling Judge)

100 years of scientific breakthroughs - by women ↘

(Source: thefeministhub)

Scientists Discover a Cost Effective Way to Produce Hydrogen from Urine ↘

Do you love the adventure of a road trip, but could do without the constant gas station pit stops to refuel and – ahem – release? Well, chemists have found a way to combine refueling your car and relieving yourself by creating a new catalyst that is able to extract hydrogen from urine. The process which was discovered by Gerardine Botte of Ohio University focuses in on a catalyst that would have a variety of applications, including fuel for hydrogen powered cars and cleaning up municipal waters.

At last, my childhood dream of in-car toilets may yet become a practical idea!!!  And it could save the world too!