Awesome Stuff Women Did

Because women have done more in the past 10,000 years than just pop out babies and make sandwiches.

DISCLAIMER: We make no claim that all women featured here are saints. They did awesome stuff; the women themselves might not have been. Keep that in mind before sending angry notes.

death-by-avengers:

You know the Big Bang Theory episode where Sheldon adopts all those cats

and names them after scientists who were part of the Manhattan Project

WHERE IS THE “HOWARD STARK” CAT SHELDON

WHERE

Serious question, though: where were the Leona Woods and Chien-Shiung Wu cats?  Or the later-Nobel Laureate Maria Goeppert-Mayer?

Loads of women scientists were involved in the Manhattan Project.  Read more about them here!

It is funny, how erasure of women from history can be a double-edged sword.  On the one hand, it would be nice to think that women were not tangled up in such a destructive project.  But they were there, and we owe it to them and future generations to remember them.  

I think we all know who was on Howard Stark’s security detail, though:

Became the youngest Ph.D at 20 at the time (1932); wrote her dissertation on Virginia Woolf, the first major piece of feminist literature on Woolf; became the first foreign correspondent to fly through Siberia into the Soviet Arctic while working for The New York Harold Tribune; secretly escorted 1,000 war refugees from Italy to the US and lobbied for their extended stay; was the first journalist to enter the newly established Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan; was the only US American journalist allowed to accompany the 4,500 Holocaust survivors back to Germany    on board the ship Exodus 1947; wrote reports that helped advance the dissolution of Displaced Person camps in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East; is considered a symbol of Jews’ rescue from oppression. (Ruth Gruber)

Became the youngest Ph.D at 20 at the time (1932); wrote her dissertation on Virginia Woolf, the first major piece of feminist literature on Woolf; became the first foreign correspondent to fly through Siberia into the Soviet Arctic while working for The New York Harold Tribune; secretly escorted 1,000 war refugees from Italy to the US and lobbied for their extended stay; was the first journalist to enter the newly established Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan; was the only US American journalist allowed to accompany the 4,500 Holocaust survivors back to Germany on board the ship Exodus 1947; wrote reports that helped advance the dissolution of Displaced Person camps in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East; is considered a symbol of Jews’ rescue from oppression. (Ruth Gruber)

Racked up 309 kills against Axis forces as a sniper, including 36 enemy snipers, attained the rank of Major, and was awarded a Gold Star of the Hero of the Soviet Union (Lyudimila Pavlichenko)

Racked up 309 kills against Axis forces as a sniper, including 36 enemy snipers, attained the rank of Major, and was awarded a Gold Star of the Hero of the Soviet Union (Lyudimila Pavlichenko)

Smuggled at least 2500 children and infants from the Warsaw Ghetto. (Irena Sendlerowa)

Smuggled at least 2500 children and infants from the Warsaw Ghetto. (Irena Sendlerowa)

Helped develop the process of separating uranium into the U-235 and U-238 isotopes by gaseous diffusion in the Manhattan Project. (Chien-Shiung Wu)

Helped develop the process of separating uranium into the U-235 and U-238 isotopes by gaseous diffusion in the Manhattan Project. (Chien-Shiung Wu)

Maintained wireless radio communication between Nazi-occupied Paris and Britain for over a year, even after the rest of her crew were captured, before being betrayed to the Germans, who killed her in Dachau.  Posthumously awarded the George Cross, the highest non-combat award in Britain, the Croix de Guerre with Gold Star, and a Mention in Dispatches.  (Noor Inayat Khan)

Maintained wireless radio communication between Nazi-occupied Paris and Britain for over a year, even after the rest of her crew were captured, before being betrayed to the Germans, who killed her in Dachau.  Posthumously awarded the George Cross, the highest non-combat award in Britain, the Croix de Guerre with Gold Star, and a Mention in Dispatches.  (Noor Inayat Khan)

Formed half of student anti-Nazi group, the White Rose.  In the middle of WWII.  At the University of Munich. (Sophie Scholl, Traute Lafrenz, Katharina Schueddekopf, Lieselotte “Lilo” Berndl, and  Marie-Luise Jahn)

Formed half of student anti-Nazi group, the White Rose.  In the middle of WWII.  At the University of Munich. (Sophie Scholl, Traute Lafrenz, Katharina Schueddekopf, Lieselotte “Lilo” Berndl, and Marie-Luise Jahn)

Invented frequency-hopping spread-spectrum technology, a forerunner of WiFi and CDMA, to to prevent jamming of radio-guided missile signals and facilitate top-secret wartime communication during WWII, all while being a Hollywood starlet. Other applications include cellphones (Sprint and Verizon’s wireless technology is based on this system) and wireless telemetry applications to monitor vital signs of patients without interference from other medical devices in the intensive care unit. (Hedy Kiesler Markey, better known as Hedy Lamarr)