Awesome Stuff Women Did

Because women have done more in the past 10,000 years than just pop out babies and make sandwiches.

DISCLAIMER: We make no claim that all women featured here are saints. They did awesome stuff; the women themselves might not have been. Keep that in mind before sending angry notes.

Invented absinthe, inspiring some of the finest European writers, artists, and musicians of the 19th century. (Mère Henriod/Mother Henriot)

Invented absinthe, inspiring some of the finest European writers, artists, and musicians of the 19th century. (Mère Henriod/Mother Henriot)

rosietint:

In History: Sophie Germain
Germain, born April 1, 1776, was a mathematician who often worked under a pseudonym because she was concerned her work wouldn’t be taken seriously if people knew she was a woman. One of the pioneers of elasticity theory, she won the grand prize from  the Paris Academy of Sciences for her essay on the subject. Her work on  Fermat’s Last Theorem provided a foundation for mathematicians exploring  the subject for hundreds of years after.

rosietint:

In History: Sophie Germain

Germain, born April 1, 1776, was a mathematician who often worked under a pseudonym because she was concerned her work wouldn’t be taken seriously if people knew she was a woman. One of the pioneers of elasticity theory, she won the grand prize from the Paris Academy of Sciences for her essay on the subject. Her work on Fermat’s Last Theorem provided a foundation for mathematicians exploring the subject for hundreds of years after.

Played the harpsichord before King Louis XIV at the age of five. Was noticed by Madame de Montespan, and was kept on in her entourage.  Her opera Céphale et Procris was the first written by a woman in France. Composed some of the earlist French examples of the sonata. Composed early examples of the new genre of accompanied harpsichord works, where the instrument is used in an obbligato role with the violin. (Élisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre)

Led her own feudal army on the Second Crusade, alongside her husband, the King of France.  After that crusade turned sour and she got fed up with her marriage, she got it annulled and then married the future King of England.  Administered her own duchy, and held court there temporarily, where she helped shape and promote the troubadour culture further.  After outliving her second husband, administered England in her son’s name (Richard Lionheart) while he was on crusade.  Caused many scandals and was the horror of conservative clergymen. (Eleanor of Aquitaine)

Led her own feudal army on the Second Crusade, alongside her husband, the King of France. After that crusade turned sour and she got fed up with her marriage, she got it annulled and then married the future King of England. Administered her own duchy, and held court there temporarily, where she helped shape and promote the troubadour culture further. After outliving her second husband, administered England in her son’s name (Richard Lionheart) while he was on crusade. Caused many scandals and was the horror of conservative clergymen. (Eleanor of Aquitaine)

Translated and wrote commentary on Sir Isaac Newton’s work, Principia Mathematica. Her translation, published posthumously in 1759, is still considered the French standard by which all others are measured.  She also published several papers throughout her lifetime, including one describing her research on fire, in which she correctly predicted what would later be described as infrared radiation.  And some modern biographers report having seen in her notebooks a derivative of the equation made famous by Einstein: E = MC2.  A crater on Venus was named in her honor.  Her longtime lover, the philosopher and poet Voltaire, wrote to the King of Prussia that she “was a great man whose only fault was being a woman.” (Èmilie du Châtelet)

Translated and wrote commentary on Sir Isaac Newton’s work, Principia Mathematica. Her translation, published posthumously in 1759, is still considered the French standard by which all others are measured.  She also published several papers throughout her lifetime, including one describing her research on fire, in which she correctly predicted what would later be described as infrared radiation.  And some modern biographers report having seen in her notebooks a derivative of the equation made famous by Einstein: E = MC2. A crater on Venus was named in her honor.  Her longtime lover, the philosopher and poet Voltaire, wrote to the King of Prussia that she “was a great man whose only fault was being a woman.” (Èmilie du Châtelet)

Directed the first narrative fiction film (Alice Guy-Blaché)

Pioneered the field of radioactivity, discovered polonium and radium, ran mobile X-ray units on the battlefields of WWI, oversaw the earliest research into radiation for cancer treatments, forced a reconsideration of the foundations of physics,  while being the first person to win two Nobel Prizes. (Marie Curie)

Pioneered the field of radioactivity, discovered polonium and radium, ran mobile X-ray units on the battlefields of WWI, oversaw the earliest research into radiation for cancer treatments, forced a reconsideration of the foundations of physics,  while being the first person to win two Nobel Prizes. (Marie Curie)

Turned the tide of the Hundred Years War (Saint Joan of Arc)

Turned the tide of the Hundred Years War (Saint Joan of Arc)