Awesome Stuff Women Did

Because women have done more in the past 10,000 years than just pop out babies and make sandwiches.

DISCLAIMER: We make no claim that all women featured here are saints. They did awesome stuff; the women themselves might not have been. Keep that in mind before sending angry notes.

Organized 20,000 of New York City’s 32,000 shirtwaist trade workers, leading them in a three-month strike which ended in union contracts at all shops— except at Triangle Shirtwaist.  The following year, 150 Triangle Shirtwaist workers died in a fire due to the unsafe conditions, which were part of the general strike’s complaints.  Founded a working-class women’s suffrage organization.  Founded a working class housewives’ union to advocate for housing, education, and consumer issues.  While living in a retirement home, convinced the workers there to organize.(Clara Lemlich)

Organized 20,000 of New York City’s 32,000 shirtwaist trade workers, leading them in a three-month strike which ended in union contracts at all shops— except at Triangle Shirtwaist.  The following year, 150 Triangle Shirtwaist workers died in a fire due to the unsafe conditions, which were part of the general strike’s complaints.  Founded a working-class women’s suffrage organization.  Founded a working class housewives’ union to advocate for housing, education, and consumer issues.  While living in a retirement home, convinced the workers there to organize.(Clara Lemlich)

Graduated from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Astronomy in 1974 and did graduate work in Computer Science at USC. Before receiving her Astronomy degree, she joined Jet Propulsion Laboratory for temporary summer employment, and accepted a position after receiving her degree in the Outer Planet Satellite Ephemeris Development Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a senior engineer (1974–1981). In March 1979, she discovered the anomalous “crescent” off the limb of Jupiter’s moon Io in a picture of Io taken by Voyager 1 for navigation, after the Voyager 1 close encounter with Jupiter. She proposed a series of hypotheses and conducted investigations to prove or disprove them, to identify the “crescent”. She was able to deduce that the observation was a plume erupting from the surface of Io, and volcanic in origin. Her discovery was announced to the world on March 12, 1979.  This was the first non-Earth volcanic eruption ever witnessed and the first proof that other bodies in our solar system are geologically active.  Her discovery of active geology on other worlds is heralded as one of the most important discoveries of the planetary exploration program. (Linda A. Morabito)

Graduated from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Astronomy in 1974 and did graduate work in Computer Science at USC. Before receiving her Astronomy degree, she joined Jet Propulsion Laboratory for temporary summer employment, and accepted a position after receiving her degree in the Outer Planet Satellite Ephemeris Development Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a senior engineer (1974–1981). In March 1979, she discovered the anomalous “crescent” off the limb of Jupiter’s moon Io in a picture of Io taken by Voyager 1 for navigation, after the Voyager 1 close encounter with Jupiter. She proposed a series of hypotheses and conducted investigations to prove or disprove them, to identify the “crescent”. She was able to deduce that the observation was a plume erupting from the surface of Io, and volcanic in origin. Her discovery was announced to the world on March 12, 1979.  This was the first non-Earth volcanic eruption ever witnessed and the first proof that other bodies in our solar system are geologically active.  Her discovery of active geology on other worlds is heralded as one of the most important discoveries of the planetary exploration program. (Linda A. Morabito)

Five Fascinating Latinas for Women’s History Month ↘

(Source: bibliofeminista)


sheiswolf-deactivated20131219:

LOVE the new layout!

Isn’t it great?  It does everything I want in a layout— makes the pictures huge, shows the tags, supports Disqus, lets me link pages— all with nice dignified, feminine script!

ETA: Actually, now that I think about it, it doesn’t support Disqus! D:  Anyone know how/if I can manipulate the CSS to include it? /o\

Developed innovative yet highly controversial treatments for polio, involving prolonged applications of moist hot packs to help ease muscles, relieve pain and allow limbs to be stretched and gently exercised, at odds with the orthodox treatment of immobilisation through the use of plaster casts and splints. Vilified by the medical establishment, became a hugely popular public figure, once voted the ‘Most admirable woman in the United States’. Seen as beacons of hope by parents desperate for their stricken children and dissatisfied by existing treatments, a series of treatment centres opened across the United States throughout the 1940s. Her methods retain a place in rehabilitative medicine to this day. (Sister Elizabeth Kenny)

Developed innovative yet highly controversial treatments for polio, involving prolonged applications of moist hot packs to help ease muscles, relieve pain and allow limbs to be stretched and gently exercised, at odds with the orthodox treatment of immobilisation through the use of plaster casts and splints. Vilified by the medical establishment, became a hugely popular public figure, once voted the ‘Most admirable woman in the United States’. Seen as beacons of hope by parents desperate for their stricken children and dissatisfied by existing treatments, a series of treatment centres opened across the United States throughout the 1940s. Her methods retain a place in rehabilitative medicine to this day. (Sister Elizabeth Kenny)

Geraldine Anne Ferraro (August 26, 1935 – March 26, 2011) was an American attorney, a Democratic Party politician and a former member of the United States House of Representatives. She was the first female Vice Presidential candidate representing a major American political party. Ferraro grew up in New York and became a teacher and lawyer. She joined the Queens County District Attorney’s Office in 1974, where she headed the new Special Victims Bureau that dealt with sex crimes, child abuse, and domestic violence. She was elected to Congress in 1978, where she rose rapidly in the party hierarchy while focusing on legislation to bring equity for women in the areas of wages, pensions, and retirement plans. In 1984, former Vice President and presidential candidate Walter Mondale selected Ferraro to be his running mate in the upcoming election. In doing so she became the only Italian American to be a major-party national nominee in addition to being the first woman. But in the general election, Mondale and Ferraro were defeated. She served as a United States Ambassador to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights from 1993 until 1996 in the presidential administration of Bill Clinton. She also continued her career as a journalist, author, and businesswoman, and served in the 2008 presidential campaign of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Geraldine Anne Ferraro (August 26, 1935 – March 26, 2011) was an American attorney, a Democratic Party politician and a former member of the United States House of Representatives. She was the first female Vice Presidential candidate representing a major American political party. Ferraro grew up in New York and became a teacher and lawyer. She joined the Queens County District Attorney’s Office in 1974, where she headed the new Special Victims Bureau that dealt with sex crimes, child abuse, and domestic violence. She was elected to Congress in 1978, where she rose rapidly in the party hierarchy while focusing on legislation to bring equity for women in the areas of wages, pensions, and retirement plans. In 1984, former Vice President and presidential candidate Walter Mondale selected Ferraro to be his running mate in the upcoming election. In doing so she became the only Italian American to be a major-party national nominee in addition to being the first woman. But in the general election, Mondale and Ferraro were defeated. She served as a United States Ambassador to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights from 1993 until 1996 in the presidential administration of Bill Clinton. She also continued her career as a journalist, author, and businesswoman, and served in the 2008 presidential campaign of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton.

medicinals:

Female members of the French resistance

medicinals:

Female members of the French resistance

After her husband’s alliance with Rome was ignored after his death, her daughters raped, and she tortured by Roman soldiers, led the Iceni, Trinovantes, and other indigenous British tribes in revolt. Captured the city of Camulodunum and systematically demolished it, followed by Londinium and Verulamium, slaughtering 80,000 Romans along the way.  Though ultimately defeated, the rebellion led the Romans to take a much more conciliatory stance to the native Britons, and never fully conquered the island.  (Boudica)

After her husband’s alliance with Rome was ignored after his death, her daughters raped, and she tortured by Roman soldiers, led the Iceni, Trinovantes, and other indigenous British tribes in revolt. Captured the city of Camulodunum and systematically demolished it, followed by Londinium and Verulamium, slaughtering 80,000 Romans along the way.  Though ultimately defeated, the rebellion led the Romans to take a much more conciliatory stance to the native Britons, and never fully conquered the island.  (Boudica)

Disobeyed a bus driver’s orders to give up her seat for a white man. Was sequentially arrested and fined for violating a city ordinance, Leading to the Montgomery Bus Boycott and became a symbol of the Civil Rights Movement.  A long time Civil Rights activist, she also fought for justice for black victims of rape perpetrated by white men, which were almost always ignored by the police and justice system.  After her death at 92, her casket was placed in the rotunda of the United States Capitol for two days, so the nation could pay its respects, an honor usually reserved for Presidents of the United States. (Rosa Parks)

Disobeyed a bus driver’s orders to give up her seat for a white man. Was sequentially arrested and fined for violating a city ordinance, Leading to the Montgomery Bus Boycott and became a symbol of the Civil Rights Movement.  A long time Civil Rights activist, she also fought for justice for black victims of rape perpetrated by white men, which were almost always ignored by the police and justice system.  After her death at 92, her casket was placed in the rotunda of the United States Capitol for two days, so the nation could pay its respects, an honor usually reserved for Presidents of the United States. (Rosa Parks)

femaleartists:

Swoon (Born 1977)
“SWOON is a street artist from New York City who specializes in life-size wheatpaste prints and paper cutouts of figures. Swoon studied painting at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and started doing street art around 1999. Swoon does not release her real name to the public to avoid prosecution for the crime of “vandalism” associated with street art.”
“Swoon’s worlds are often populated by realistically rendered cut-out street people, often her friends and family. Riding bikes, talking on a stoop, going grocery shopping - these people traverse a cityscape of her own unique invention. Bridges, fire escapes, water towers and street signs create crisscrossing shadows and spaces through which her figures move. Inspired by both art historical and folk sources, ranging from German Expressionist wood block prints to Indonesian shadow puppets, Swoon uses cut paper to play with positive and negative space in a conceptually driven exploration of the experience of the streets.”

femaleartists:

Swoon (Born 1977)

“SWOON is a street artist from New York City who specializes in life-size wheatpaste prints and paper cutouts of figures. Swoon studied painting at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and started doing street art around 1999. Swoon does not release her real name to the public to avoid prosecution for the crime of “vandalism” associated with street art.”

“Swoon’s worlds are often populated by realistically rendered cut-out street people, often her friends and family. Riding bikes, talking on a stoop, going grocery shopping - these people traverse a cityscape of her own unique invention. Bridges, fire escapes, water towers and street signs create crisscrossing shadows and spaces through which her figures move. Inspired by both art historical and folk sources, ranging from German Expressionist wood block prints to Indonesian shadow puppets, Swoon uses cut paper to play with positive and negative space in a conceptually driven exploration of the experience of the streets.”