Awesome Stuff Women Did

Because women have done more in the past 10,000 years than just pop out babies and make sandwiches.

DISCLAIMER: We make no claim that all women featured here are saints. They did awesome stuff; the women themselves might not have been. Keep that in mind before sending angry notes.

Pioneered entomology. Documented the life cycles of 186 insect species, including the transformation of caterpillars to butterflies.  Proved definitively that insects do not spontaneous generate from mud, as believed by most contemporaries.  Published her findings (including her detailed paintings) in German instead of Latin, allowing the non-scientists to understand insects.  Went on a self-funded scientific expedition of Surinam, unheard of for women of her time, becoming the first European to observe and record much of the plant and insect life there.  One of the first naturalists to observe insects directly. (Maria Sibylla Merian)

Pioneered entomology. Documented the life cycles of 186 insect species, including the transformation of caterpillars to butterflies.  Proved definitively that insects do not spontaneous generate from mud, as believed by most contemporaries.  Published her findings (including her detailed paintings) in German instead of Latin, allowing the non-scientists to understand insects.  Went on a self-funded scientific expedition of Surinam, unheard of for women of her time, becoming the first European to observe and record much of the plant and insect life there.  One of the first naturalists to observe insects directly. (Maria Sibylla Merian)


History is full of fabulous females who have been systematically ignored, forgotten, or simply written out of the records.
They’re not all saints, they’re not all geniuses, but they do deserve remembering.

- Sandi Toksvig, a.k.a. the patron saint of ASWD!

History is full of fabulous females who have been systematically ignored, forgotten, or simply written out of the records.

They’re not all saints, they’re not all geniuses, but they do deserve remembering.

- Sandi Toksvig, a.k.a. the patron saint of ASWD!

Hi New Followers!

I’ve had lots of new followers since my last real update, but being featured by Sadie Magazine was the final kick I needed to get back to this.

Here’s a quick rundown of the philosophy behind this blog:

Women’s achievements tend to go, not necessarily unmentioned, but uncredited in the history books.  Women have always been doing awesome stuff, much of which we couldn’t do without in today’s world.  But the problem is so few are remembered and honored for their contributions to the modern science and society (like inventing Kevlar).  And there are also women who have done stuff that is just flat out impressive (like striking out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig back-to-back).  So the point of this blog is to be cheeky and stick our collective tongues out at sexists who make stupid jokes about sandwiches and kitchens and tell them to GTFO their Wi-Fi if they don’t want the ghost of Hedy Lamarr to come after them.

I tend to avoid posts about women who were just the “first woman” to do something— but fortunately, most “first women” did plenty of other awesome stuff in their lives.

As for me, I’m Alexa, I’m a ladytype and a feminist (shocker!). I also run another blog about ladies, the ones in the comics medium, called Ladies Making Comics which, you know, you could check out and follow maybe? I do have a full-time job, which is nice, but I’m still working out how to comfortably fit blogging into my days, so submissions are very much appreciated!

Thanks for following, hope you enjoy and learn some things!

invented the 80’s computer the BBC Micro, and designed the instruction set for ARM microprocessors that power most mobile phones, tablets, and embedded computer systems. (Sophie Wilson)

invented the 80’s computer the BBC Micro, and designed the instruction set for ARM microprocessors that power most mobile phones, tablets, and embedded computer systems. (Sophie Wilson)

Feminist tumblr of the day: Awesome Stuff Women Did ↘

sadiemagazine:

Because women have done more in the past 10,000 years than just pop out babies and make sandwiches.

Thanks for the rec, Sadie!  I promise to update this tumblr more :D

When a man gives his opinion he’s a man. When a woman gives her opinion she’s a bitch.

Bette Davis, the original HBIC. Happy Birthday Bette! (via sexisbeautiful)

BOSSED UP

(via stefi-leekx)


rosietint:

In History: Sophie Germain
Germain, born April 1, 1776, was a mathematician who often worked under a pseudonym because she was concerned her work wouldn’t be taken seriously if people knew she was a woman. One of the pioneers of elasticity theory, she won the grand prize from  the Paris Academy of Sciences for her essay on the subject. Her work on  Fermat’s Last Theorem provided a foundation for mathematicians exploring  the subject for hundreds of years after.

rosietint:

In History: Sophie Germain

Germain, born April 1, 1776, was a mathematician who often worked under a pseudonym because she was concerned her work wouldn’t be taken seriously if people knew she was a woman. One of the pioneers of elasticity theory, she won the grand prize from the Paris Academy of Sciences for her essay on the subject. Her work on Fermat’s Last Theorem provided a foundation for mathematicians exploring the subject for hundreds of years after.

femaleartists:

 
Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting, 1630s, Artemisia Gentileschi (July 8, 1593 - 1653)
 
The victim of rape at a young age at the hands of her painting teacher, Agostino Tassi, Gentileschi’s works were often critiqued by using this event as an automatic translator for her works. Paintings such as this are largely ignored in favor of more violent pieces. These pieces, depicting strong women in positions of aggression toward men, have come to be thought of as a trademark of Gentileschi’s work. In her Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting, she presents another kind of painting that expresses her identity as a woman and a painter.
Many of her paintings have been confused for Orazio Gentileschi’s, her father. He also has been accused of painting works and attributing them to her. 

Because someone once asked for a more in-depth post about her

femaleartists:

Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting, 1630s, Artemisia Gentileschi (July 8, 1593 - 1653)

 

The victim of rape at a young age at the hands of her painting teacher, Agostino Tassi, Gentileschi’s works were often critiqued by using this event as an automatic translator for her works. Paintings such as this are largely ignored in favor of more violent pieces. These pieces, depicting strong women in positions of aggression toward men, have come to be thought of as a trademark of Gentileschi’s work. In her Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting, she presents another kind of painting that expresses her identity as a woman and a painter.

Many of her paintings have been confused for Orazio Gentileschi’s, her father. He also has been accused of painting works and attributing them to her. 

Because someone once asked for a more in-depth post about her

Provided refuge, food, and medical and spiritual aid to Katipuneros (revolutionaries) in her small convenience store. Illiterate and a single mother, she also let revolutionaries hold secret meetings in her house. Became known as the Mother of the Katipunan, as well as Tandang Sora (or Old Sora), at 84 years old. When the Spaniards interrogated her, she did not divulge what she knew about the revolution. Because of her age, she was sentenced to be exiled to Mariana Islands. She returned from exile under the American occupation.  The revolution impoverished Tandang Sora. Notwithstanding her dire conditions, she politely declined the colonial government’s offer of a lifetime pension. She was content and happy, she told the government emissary, that she was able to help in regaining her country’s freedom. She died at the age of 107. (Melchora Aquino)

Provided refuge, food, and medical and spiritual aid to Katipuneros (revolutionaries) in her small convenience store. Illiterate and a single mother, she also let revolutionaries hold secret meetings in her house. Became known as the Mother of the Katipunan, as well as Tandang Sora (or Old Sora), at 84 years old. When the Spaniards interrogated her, she did not divulge what she knew about the revolution. Because of her age, she was sentenced to be exiled to Mariana Islands. She returned from exile under the American occupation. The revolution impoverished Tandang Sora. Notwithstanding her dire conditions, she politely declined the colonial government’s offer of a lifetime pension. She was content and happy, she told the government emissary, that she was able to help in regaining her country’s freedom. She died at the age of 107. (Melchora Aquino)